Crime Scene Investigation


                                   

Crime Scene Investigation





Welcome To Real World CSI



Crime Scene Investigation




























Welcome to the All About Forensic Science website crime scene investigation pages. From here you will be able to access comprehensive information relating to all aspects of crime scene investigation. Including:


  • Protecting & Preserving A Crime Scene
  • Different Types of Crime Scene
  • Types of Evidence At A Crime-Scene
  • Crime Scene Processing & Documentation

Crime Scene Basics


The following information was produced by The U.S. Department of Justice.


Responding to a crime-scene is a critical step in the scientific investigation of a case. Unless the crime-scene response is handled correctly, the investigation may be severely compromised. Crime-Scene investigators and crime-scene specialists are responsible for identifying, securing, collecting, and preserving evidence which is submitted to the crime laboratory.

The investigator's knowledge in crime-scene documentation and the variety of methods for the collection and processing of all types of evidence is crucial. In addition, the investigator must often make timely decisions whether to obtain written consent or a search warrant, so that the evidence will be admissible and not subject to a motion to suppress.


Types of Evidence


TESTIMONIAL: Statements or the spoken word from the victim(s) or witness(es).


PHYSICAL: "Real evidence", refers to such things as hairs, fibers, latent fingerprints, and biological material.


Locard's Exchange Principle


Crime scene concept which states that every time someone enters an environment, something is added to and removed from it. The notion that "every contact leaves a trace," applies to contact between individuals as well as between individuals and a physical environment. Crime-scene investigators are taught to assume that physical evidence will be left behind, the amount and nature of this will largely depend on the circumstances of the crime.


Examples of Evidence Left Behind at A Crime-Scene


  • Biological material e.g. blood, semen or saliva
  • Fibers
  • Paint Chips
  • Glass
  • Soil & Vegetation
  • Accelerants
  • Fingerprints
  • Hair
  • Impression evidence e.g. shoe prints, tire tracks or tool marks
  • Fracture patterns e.g. glass fragments or adhesive tape pieces
  • Narcotics

  • Physical Evidence: The Silent Witness


    Evidence often tells a story and helps crime scene investigators re-create the crime scene and establish the sequence of events. Physical evidence can corroborate statements from the victim(s), witness(es) and/or suspect(s). If analyzed and interpreted properly, physical evidence is more reliable than testimonial evidence; testimonial evidence is more subjective in nature.

    An individual's perception of events and memory of what happened can be incomplete or inaccurate. Physical evidence is objective and when documented, collected, and preserved properly may be the only definitive way to reliably place or link someone to a crime scene. This is why Physical evidence is known as the "silent witness."



    Thinking About Becoming A Forensic Science Student?

                                  Psychology Programs

    SSN IFrame Widget - Blue

    Find a Forensic Science School




    Learn More About CSI


    Click on the links below for information about various aspects of crime scene investigation.


    Types of Crime Scene





















    Types of Crime Scene



    Crime Scene Evidence





















    Crime Scene Evidence



    Crime Scene Collection Techniques





















    Crime Scene Collection Techniques



    Crime Scene Documentation





















    Crime Scene Documentation



    USA Forensic Science Programs Search


    Forensic Science























    Find The Perfect Program For You Today!

                                  Psychology Programs

    SSN IFrame Widget - Blue

    Find a Forensic Science School




    Back To Top of Page


    Go From Crime Scene Investigation Back To The Home Page


                                       

    New! Comments

    Have your say about what you just read! Leave me a comment in the box below.

         Advertise Here!








    Behavioral Science

    Criminal Profiling